In our fast-paced, frenetic world, to get client buy-in fast means getting people’s attention quickly. But it’s not just their attention – you’ve probably seen content online where there’s some kind of shocking, attention grabbing hook, but no substance. We want clients to see what we’re offering and say “HELL YES”. 

 

But how do we do that? 

 

We’ve spent years building and refining our visual model technique to get client buy-in fast. We use visual models weaved together through storytelling to engage with audiences and potential clients. 

 

The beginning of every “pitch” starts with the Results Model. And it’s foundational to get client buy-in to your services. 

 

What is the Results Model and how does it work? 

The Results Model is designed to show an audience the gap between where they are now and where they want to be. 

 

Once they see that gap, they’ll want to know how to close it. 

 

This is crucial for getting buy-in FAST. 

 

It shows that you understand their situation and their desires. It builds trust between you and your audience.

 

We call this model the Results Model and it comes it three varieties.

1. Hero’s Journey Style Results Model

2. Spectrum-style Results Model

3. Matrix-style Results Model

 

In this post, we’re going to break down each of the 3 Results Model types and show you how they work to get client buy-in fast.

 

1. The Hero’s Journey Results Model

The Hero’s Journey-style of Results Model follows the classic storyline that we see in movies and books. 

 

We use a simplified version of the Hero’s Journey to create this style of Results Model. 

There are five parts:

  1. OPENING: Where does the story begin? What is the opening scene? Usually, the story begins before they’re ready to work with you. 
  2. BUILD-UP: The story starts to build and there’s some sort of progress that happens. Things are moving forward and developing.
  3. COMPLICATION: This is when the ‘you know what’ hits the fan. Something goes wrong, there’s a challenge or a drama. This is usually when there’s enough pain for your audience to recognise, ‘Hey, I’ve got a problem and I need a solution’. 
  4. RESOLUTION: The resolution is where you come in as the expert. You help them to solve the challenges they are face. 
  5. HAPPY ENDING: The story ends with a beautiful happy ending. This is the result or outcome achieved. 

 

Hero’s Journey Shapes

Appropriate shapes for a Hero’s Journey are usually linear and show some sort of upwards momentum. There is a sense of progress and direction, showing that we’re moving from where we are to where we want to be. We want to show that there’s a shift happening and use a shape that will represent that.

 

When to Use

The following situations can indicate that a Hero’s Journey-style of Results Model is right for you:

  • Where your audience is an individual or small business owner.
  • Where you are a role model for your audience, so that your story can be an inspiration for your ideal client’s journey. 
  • Where one of your clients is a role model for your audience, so that a case study can be an inspiration for your ideal client’s journey. 

 

Examples of a Hero’s Journey Results Model

 

Results Model Example – Helen McIntosh

Helen McIntosh is the Operations Genie. She works with small business owners, specialising in strategy and systems. Notice the metaphor and choice of language, plus the use of icons to represent KPIs. 

 

Results Model Example – Sally Stabler

 

Sally Stabler is the founder of Get out There Marketing. She is a marketing consultant who works in the tourism industry. Sally is personally very passionate about adventure. She loves to hike and so we’ve used the analogy of a climbing mountain when it comes to achieving success in a tourism business. 

 

Results Model Example – Dixie Crawford

Dixie Crawford is an Indigenous thought leader and organisation coach. She works alongside Indigenous and non-Indigenous senior leaders and managers to create organisational cultural proficiency, identify and support the growth of Indigenous talent and achieve business outcomes. Dixie also runs a program for business leaders called Allies in Action. 

 

Hero’s Journey Dos and Don’ts

 

When using a Hero’s Journey-style of Results Model, ALWAYS tell the story in the first or third person. NEVER in second person. If you’re telling your own story, you tell it in first person. If you’re telling a client’s story, you tell it in third person. If you tell the story in second person, saying ‘you do this and that’ then all you have to do is get one tiny detail wrong, and you’re going to lose the audience. And that’s the opposite effect to what you’re trying to achieve here.

 

Remember you’re telling a story, a real-life story with real detail. Storytelling can be so powerful. Don’t make it generic because you’ll dilute the power of the story and model. You want your audience to be able to picture the person in the story and imagine it. It needs to be vivid enough that they can feel connected and identify with parts of the story that are similar to them. This model has the great potential to really build rapport and that ‘know, like and trust factor’.  That means, this model can really get client buy-in fast. 

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2. The Spectrum Results Model

The model above is an example of a Spectrum-style Results Model. There might be some style or branding variations, but essentially this is the shape. There are two ends of the spectrum, which are going to represent the extremes. At one end of the spectrum is the best-case scenario; the worst-case scenario is at the other end. And then you have the scenarios in between.

 

When to use a Spectrum Results Model?

 

The following situations can indicate that a Spectrum-style of Results Model is right for you:

  • You and your audience are measuring the quality of something, e.g. relationships, visual models, corporate partnerships. 
  • Results may move up and down the spectrum over time, rather than following the same chronological storyline of a Hero’s Journey. 
  • What is being measured can be at various levels at the same time. 

 

Examples of Spectrum Results Models

 

Results Model Example – Visual Models

The Think RAPT Results Spectrum above represents the quality of visual models that someone might have. 

 

At the extreme ends, we have the best and worst-case scenarios. And then we have the ‘in between’. 

 

Let’s say Bob has created a Results Model and it’s awesome. But his Target Model is awful. He hasn’t created his Answers Model or his Process Model yet. So they’re absent. 

 

The quality of Bob’s visual models are not all at the same level at the same time. And Bob doesn’t need to start with awful models to work his way through a Hero’s Journey experience to get awesome models. He just needs to get himself a Certified Think RAPT™ Specialist and go straight to the best case scenario! 

 

So, measuring the quality of something like visual models works best in a Spectrum-style Results Model. 

 

Results Model Example – Natalie Turvey

Natalie Turvey is a relationship coach and psychologist. She specialises in helping people build unbreakable relationships. 

 

Again, at the extreme ends, we have the best and worst-case scenarios. And then we have the ‘in between’. 

 

Let’s say Jane has an unbreakable relationship with her partner, but her relationship with her mother is broken. She’s currently healing her relationship with her sister. 

 

The quality of relationships in Jane’s life are not all the same at the same time. And Jane doesn’t need to start with broken relationships and work her way through a Hero’s Journey experience to have unbreakable relationships. And we all know a Hero’s Journey with a happy ending is not how relationships work in real life!  

 

It’s also highly likely that the quality of some of our relationships will move up and down the spectrum over time. They don’t stay static.  

 

So, measuring the quality of something like relationships works best in a Spectrum-style Results Model. 

 

Results Model Example – Stellar Partnerships

Stellar Partnerships is a strategic fundraising consultancy specialising in corporate partnerships. They work with organisations to help them establish and maintain high-quality, long-term corporate partnerships. 

 

Their Results Model measures the quality of corporate partnerships. In this model, we are again measuring the quality of relationships, just in a different context. We’re measuring the relationship between charities and their corporate partners. At the extreme ends we have the best-case scenario, being Stellar and the worst-case scenario being failure.  

 

3. The Matrix Results Model

The model above is an example of a Matrix-style Results Model. There might be some style or branding variations, but essentially this is the shape. With a vertical axis, a horizontal axis and four quadrants.

 

When to use a Matrix-style of Results Model

 

The following situations can indicate that a Matrix-style of Results Model is right for you:

  • You are an established professional service business.
  • You work with corporate clients.
  • The outcome or results for your clients is determined by two main variables. 

 

Examples of a Matrix-style Results Model

 

Results Model Example – Think RAPT

Here’s the Think RAPT Results Matrix. You’ve already seen this model earlier in the book, but I’m presenting it again here now to point out that it is an example of a Matrix-style Results Model. 

 

The two main variables for this model are service delivery and audience response. 

 

Results Model Example – Melanie Colling

Melanie Colling is the chief connection agent and partner at Experts On Air, the founder of Purpose Driven Projects and co-host of The Business Connections Podcast. She works with thought leaders who want to be seen as authorities in their industry. 

 

The two main variables for her clients are how connected they are and their credibility as a trusted authority. 

 

Key takeaways for creating your Results Model to get client buy-in fast

 

Choose the RIGHT style of Results Model

You only need one Results Model in your pitch. Choose either the Hero’s Journey, Spectrum, or Matrix – depending on your audience and business type. 

 

Don’t use jargon your audience won’t understand

This is usually the first model you present to any audience, and if you’re aiming to get client buy-in fast, you want to make sure you don’t confuse them. Use clear language that represents their journey, and their struggles. This isn’t about you diagnosing their problems. This is about relating to them where they are. 

 

The “gap” must be something that can realistically be overcome

Be mindful of showing a gap that your clients feel is realistic to overcome. If the gap seems too big – too unrealistic, your audience will tune out rather than buy-in. For example, say your ideal clients are currently in a world of pain – they’re experiencing intense trauma – and you’ve selected a Hero’s Journey style of Results Model to represent them overcoming their pain. Saying that where they want to be (the end result) is trauma-free and loving life, might seem unrealistic to your audience. They can barely get out of bed! You’ll lose trust and buy-in if you present it that way. 

 

To get buy-in from clients quickly, we want to avoid just getting their attention. We need to connect with them, highlight where they are now and where they’d like to be. This builds trust and rapport that we know what they’re going through and we have the knowledge and skills to get them to their goals.  Using a Results Model does that quickly and efficiently by tapping into the power of Visual Models to get buy-in. 

 

Which style of Results Model is right for your business? 

 

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